Relative.

« | »

IMG_8307IMG_8305CrossFit WOD – “Heath”
AMRAP in 12 min:
10 Jerks (135# M/95# W)
(Vid 1, Vid 2, Vid 3)
10 Toes-to-Bar (Vid 1, Vid 2)
30 Double Unders (Vid 1, Vid 2)

Strength Focus
5 Rep Max Overhead Squat

The definition of CrossFit: “Constantly varied functional movements performed at relatively high intensity.” What exactly does that mean? For whom does this apply?

The “relative” in the definition of CrossFit speaks to the universal scalability of the physical part of the CrossFit prescription. Load can be moved up or down. Duration can be increased or decreased. Movements that maintain the desired stimulus of the posted WOD can be substituted where a particular skill has yet to be acquired. Intensity is relative to the individual athlete in question, and in the classic application of the CrossFit prescription it is only “high” after that athlete demonstrates mechanical proficiency on a consistent basis.

IMG_8259Watching last year’s Games and Regionals, one of the things that impressed me was the tight correlation between the virtuosity of movement and the resulting work performed in the more accomplished athletes. One cannot help but notice at all levels of competition the movement flaws seen in athletes who could not sustain enough intensity to place highly in an event. If you go back in time and watch videos of the early days of CrossFit, you are struck by the emphasis on proper mechanics as a vehicle to increased efficiency and therefore more work or power output. Form is the gateway to intensity.

IMG_8257 IMG_8254 IMG_8239

CrossFit, at least the CrossFit I learned from Coach Glassman, is more than just writing a WOD on the whiteboard and opening the garage door. Every solo CrossFitter I’ve ever met, even those doing Coach’s own programming off of CrossFit.com, was better after being coached.

IMG_8234 IMG_8229 IMG_8222

“Relatively high intensity” is both a highly personal, individual metric, and a constantly moving target. It requires a shared knowledge of an athlete’s mechanics and consistency by both athlete and trainer. Programming must not make high intensity either unobtainable or unavoidable.

IMG_8227

Speak Your Mind

*