GOATS

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IMG_6057Skill Focus:
Wendler Front Squats week 1
All %ages are taken from 90% of your current 1 RM FS
65% x5
75%x 5
85% x5+

CrossFit WOD
7 rounds for time of:
7 Sumo-deadlift High-pulls – 95-lb./65-lb.
10 Ring Dips

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You are only as strong as your weakest link.  This is especially true in the sport of CrossFit, where one major hole can keep you from qualifying or getting on the podium.  It is an interesting thought experiment to realize that every sport has the ideal “Athletic Profile”, and CrossFit is no exception.

If we use the 10 General Physical Skills as the basis for this profile we can begin to see the major differences between sports and how they lead to General Physical Preparedness (GPP).  For example, it is rather obvious that a powerlifter’s skill set would be very different from an endurance athlete’s.

POWER LIFTER                          ENDURANCE ATHLETE

MALE GYMNAST                   RICH FRONING
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The exact numbers could be argued all day, but that isn’t the important message.  The take-away from these graphs is the realization that while the Endurance Athlete and Power-Lifter have amazing capacity in some areas, the majority of their GPP is lacking.  Interestingly, while the Gymnast is more well rounded, he still wouldn’t be able to compete with Rich in a well rounded GPP test like the CrossFit Games or Regionals.  

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We know that you are as fit as you are competent in each of these 10 skills.  And, we can take this theory beyond the 10 Phsyical Skills to specific modalities that are know to our sport.  If you are really good at box jump, pull ups, handstand push ups, running, and everything related to a barbell but you suck at double unders – there is a good chance you won’t be competitive.  The idea is to be good at everything, great at one or two things, and suck at nothing.

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The first and most important aspect to improving your weaknesses is knowing what you need to improve.  Everyday you will need to take a serious assessment of yourself and honestly figure out what needs the most work – not what looks like the most fun.  The next step to killing your goats is getting exposure to them.  Either volume training on a specific skill (ask the coaches for a skill worksheet), or how you approach the workout of the day.  What do you need out of it?  Rather than just coming in an attacking every workout from the angle of how you most enjoy it, or blindly going through it, look for a purpose in your modification.  Do you need to learn how to hang on to the bar for more reps?  Then lighten the load a bit and work on mental tenacity. Do you need to build the skill of the ring dip?  Maybe you need to just do as many as you can in a minute through the workout rather than beating yourself up with all 10 just to do it “as Rx’d”.  Talk to your coach and see how you can attack your personal goats and use the workouts to get better at them!

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